How Best To Handle Those Linkedin Connection Requests?

I have written about handling Linkedin connection requests in the past, but there continues to be a thorny, never-ending stream of invitations in my Linkedin inbox. I’m sure that you, like me, get connection requests that leave you scratching your head. For example, the name looks familiar, but you can’t seem to quite place it. Maybe you just came back from a conference where you met dozens of new people, but you can’t remember the ones you trusted and/or liked. Or possibly you don’t actually know the person, but they do have an interesting profile…

linkedin connection request

In any event, I receive at least a dozen invitations every week and for the vast majority, they are not people I know and come without any accompanying note. It’s often confusing and I hesitate just to reject the connections outright. For example, there are those I’m not sure if I know them, and then others whom I met many moons ago, but have not been in touch with since. In each of these cases, my position is generally not to accept the request. However, in my heart, I feel bad about just ignoring them. I kind of want to give them the benefit of the doubt.

Linkedin connection requests gone wrong

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The Craft of Storytelling – Practice Makes Perfect, But It Can Also Drive Your Closest Allies Nuts

Storytelling ArpeggioWhat makes for a great storyteller? I have to believe it’s an alchemy between talent, content and practice. Like a musician doing repeated scales and arpeggios, it is true that for those who live in close proximity, the practice can also drive one a bit nuts. The craft of storytelling is as old as the ages. It is the human condition to need to share and listen to stories; stories that move us. Some people are more gifted storytellers than others; but practice can make up a lot of the difference.

Crafting Your Stories…

It struck me, the other day, that people who have lots of friends probably have a better chance to become great storytellers. At the very least, they will be able to practice a good deal more with a live audience. If you only had a few friends, you won’t be able to repeat the same story too many times. Someone who has many friends can practice the storytelling across his or her network.

Friends & Family

Friends and family are often indicated as the first round of seed financing. They also serve as your first (core) level of fans; if they don’t want to talk about you, then you’ve got a problem. Friends and family are, naturally, the first (and most important) audience for your own storytelling. In my case, I know that I am no comedian. My (few) jokes need a lot more work. 

But when it comes to being a storyteller, it is important to be able to tell them repeatedly and in different situations. When practicing them, you can’t abuse your intimate family and friends with the same story over and over (that’s what Grandpa will do at dinner, glass of Scotch at hand). Thus, it is useful to have a wider circle of friends to refine your story and the storytelling. People’s reactions are the best feedback. If they say too often, “Yeah, Minter, that was interesting”, more than likely I need to go back to the drawing board. 

Develop Your Strategy to Practice More

Even if one doesn’t have a large network of friends, one needs to find an appropriate strategy to practice more. For the introvert storytellers, who might have a smaller (but tighter) group of friends, one will need to find alternative avenues. Depending on the personality, one such strategy is to write up the stories or record them on a private link and have the web friends give feedback.